A tip for caregivers: USE COTTON SHEETS AND BLANKETS.

While the microfiber sheets are pretty, soft, and warm, they trap moisture close to the skin and cause skin breakdown, bed sores, and yeast infections.

My mom was always cold, especially in the winter months. And they have all of these really thick warm fleece or “microfiber” sheets and blankets and they are SO SOFT! My mom loved them. I bought her different sheets and blankets for her bed. But I noticed last winter when we switched over to the winter bedding, Mom started having problems with her skin. It was breaking down and she was getting yeast infections between her legs and on her backside. One day I accidentally spilled a little water on her blanket and I watched it run and pool but not absorb. That was like a light bulb going on in my head. The sheets and blankets were keeping moisture (sweat, urine, whatever) on the top surface and always against her skin. I went back to all cotton sheets and blankets and the problem went away. So that’s my tip: while the microfiber sheets and blankets are pretty, soft, and warm, if your loved one is not as mobile anymore and spends a lot of time in bed, don’t use them. Use cotton sheets and blankets (100% cotton if you can find them, or at least 60% cotton will be good). There are nice flannel sheets that are warmer, or you can always double up on the regular cotton sheets for extra warmth. Any moisture then will be absorbed into the sheets and blankets and not stay on the top surface as I show in my little video demonstration.

About Doug Seubert

My name is Doug Seubert and I live in Wisconsin (USA). I am working toward a Masters in public health, and I am the President and CEO of a new non-profit organization: Marshfield Area Purple Angels. My blogs share resources, tools, and information about various public health topics, with a strong emphasis on community health education, effective health communication, and health literacy. I am also the creator of "The End of Life Survival Guide" featuring tips and resources for caregivers of a loved one near the end of life.
This entry was posted in Helpful Tips and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s